Course Calendar

 Course Calendar 3 TNA

 

 Course Calendar 3b TNA

 

COURSE CALENDAR
2020

“Be successful and attract attention”

 

Scholastic Program

Toronto Nobel Academy has faith in the significance and benefit of finishing an optional training. Our school theory incorporates a pledge to achieve each understudy to enable him or her to accomplish an effective result from their school involvement with Toronto Nobel Academy. The idea of finishing an auxiliary instruction is basic. Getting a secondary school recognition has turned into an undeniably critical essential for monetary and social portability on the planet. Youngsters with a secondary school training are vastly improved prepared for the present-day life. They will probably be for all time utilized and additionally to be confessed to present auxiliary organizations on encourage their training and wind up noticeably dynamic individuals from our general public. In Ontario, understudies are required to stay in optional school until the point when the understudy has achieved the age of eighteen or acquired an Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

Educational Modules Principles

Toronto Nobel Academy offers a recognized educational module. A differing scope of required parts furnishes understudies with invigorating difficulties and the chance to procure information, aptitudes and qualities. The accomplishment: planning for universities, colleges and life. The characterizing normal for Toronto Nobel Academy instruction is the compulsory cooperation in each of its center curricular segments, prompting Toronto Nobel Academy Diploma upon graduation.

Toronto Nobel Academy creates young fellows and ladies of individual uprightness, who are set up for universities and colleges, societal change, mindful contribution and authority in their neighborhood, national and worldwide groups.

The educational programs concentrate on:

  • critical-thinking aptitudes
  • individual potential
  • self-train, regard, duty and responsibility
  • spiritual and moral improvement
  • democratic standards
  • personal wellness and wellbeing
  • environmental mindfulness and stewardship
  • the part of sex, ethnicity, race and culture in building rich, various groups
  • student-focused encounters which make authority openings

Our optional school credit courses depend on the Ontario Ministry of Education course educational programs. At Toronto Nobel Academy, the school year is isolated into three detailing periods and courses overwhelmingly keep running for the entire year. There are two report cards with a mid-term report part of the way through the primary revealing time frame and another coming toward the finish of each detailing period. The school day is separated into three hours classes starting at 9:30 a.m. also, finishing at either 4p.m. or, then again 4p.m. contingent upon the five-day plan turn.

Toronto Nobel Academy offers a far-reaching program with a wide cluster obviously offerings. To fit the bill for Toronto Nobel Academy Diploma, understudies finish courses stretching out past the prerequisites of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Toronto Nobel Academy graduates finish a four-year human sciences auxiliary school program.

Toronto Nobel Academy (TNA) offers professional educational services. We share with our students the challenge of actualizing their potential. Our staff provides optimal learning conditions with our experienced teachers and support staff members. We offer various academic services to boost each student’s confidence and to track success. Our well-educated teachers are eager to encourage students to strive for the highest standards. We provide University & College Services, Grades 9-12 Credit Courses (Regular and Fast Track courses), one-to-one instruction, small group tutoring, Language Proficiency Tests preparation, ESL Courses, Educational Counselling, and Computer Services at each student’s convenience for all school grade levels and academic subjects. The school hires teachers based on their knowledge, experience, and creativity. Our teachers are experienced and committed. At TNA, we make special effort to provide the best educational services at the most affordable price. Our qualified teachers range from certified teachers (the Ontario College of Teachers), the most excellent university students to professionals with Bachelor's, Master's, and PhD degrees.

Our philosophy is to explore the vision and mission statements that shape the decisions teachers make in their teaching, the learning goals we attempt to meet in our sessions, and the methodology used attain those goals. We encourage our learners to think positively, to be motivated, creative, and finally, self-assured. We know that self-confidence is two-thirds of success. Our thesis is that the gateway to success or passionate commitment to an open-minded search for truth. Hence, our teaching process develops and refines critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. Our experienced, committed teachers pave the way for learners to wave “the flag of success” in their learning process.

Our goal is to enhance student learning as a transformative experience. Ideally, we want our learners to feel personally changed by their participation in our academic sessions that we are offering. We want our learners to be motivated, to be confident, to reap the benefits of their success, and ultimately succeed in their future endeavour.

TNA takes an avid interest to

  • encourage students how to show compassion for others and value different perspectives
  • sustain an integrated multidisciplinary environment that facilitates excellence in teaching
  • motivate students to have positive self-images and know their strengths/challenges
  • offer curricula that promote integrated multidisciplinary approaches to public health
  • educate and prepare the next generation of researchers, teachers, and staff
  • improve and diversify learning procedures with well-educated instructors
  • give students an added incentive to view learning as a lifelong process
  • improve students' Emotional Intelligence / Multiple Intelligence
  • pave the way for students to have a growth mindset
  • teach students how to manage their time wisely
  • focus on academic, social and instructional goals
  • boost a quality education and what it promises
  • integrate authentic and useful resources
  • improve students' physical awareness
  • defer to core inquiry mission statement
  • implement multidisciplinary approaches
  • recruit and retain a diverse student body
  • focus on Policy/Procedure Manual
  • strengthen community networking
  • focus on democratic value
  • boost learning activity
  • access to technology

 Ultimately, our renewed goals for education are:

  • Accomplishing Excellence: Children and understudies of any age will accomplish abnormal amounts of scholastic execution, obtain significant aptitudes and exhibit great citizenship. Instructors will be upheld in adapting persistently and will be perceived as among the best on the planet.
  • Guaranteeing Equity: All kids and understudies will be roused to achieve their maximum capacity, with access to rich learning encounters that start during childbirth and proceed into adulthood.
  • Advancing Well-Being: All kids and understudies will create upgraded mental and physical wellbeing, a positive feeling of self and having a place, and the abilities to settle on positive decisions.
  • Upgrading Public Confidence: Ontarians will keep on having trust in a freely supported instruction framework that creates new eras of certain, proficient and minding natives.

These four objectives are interconnected – achievement in one adds to accomplishment in the others. Our advance in the course of the most recent10 years reveals to us that when teachers, understudies, guardians and watchmen, and our numerous different accomplices concentrate on few plainly characterized objectives, those objectives can be accomplished.

 Our Mission

To teach and empower young fellows and ladies to end up pioneers of character, real supporters of, and esteemed agents of their nearby, national and worldwide groups.

Our Vision

To create scholarly interest, ingrain an affection for learning and advance individual magnificence in every aspect of attempt. To give access to extraordinary encounters, offices, workforce and staff. To be a globally perceived model of instructive greatness and development.

School Organization:

Toronto Nobel Academy offers grades 9-12 credit courses In-Classes and Online in compliance with the Ontario Ministry of Education as follow:

  • Toronto Nobel Academy is a two semestered school– September to January – and February to June. Plus, we are offering summer school July to August and August to September.
  • Final Report Cards are issued in late January and late June. Mid Term Report Cards are issued in November and April. In addition, there is ongoing contact with parents regarding student progress.

Toronto Nobel Academy also offers online courses on a continuous intake basis. Our online courses will begin on September 8, 2020 and will be structured with 5 semesters, each approximately 8 weeks long, where students can earn 2 high school courses per term up to a total of 10 credits from September to June.

Example: If a student enrolls at Toronto Nobel Academy on September 08, 2020, he/she will finish a course or courses on October 27, 2020. So, each course will be delivered over a period of 8 weeks along with 110 instructional hours.

The Model of Online Delivery:

  • Synchronous (Due to COVID-19, our physical classes are running synchronously): The teacher teaches in real time with students online via Zoom webinars and the dates of the online sessions are provided on Moodle Learning Platform.
  • Asynchronous: The teacher posts offline materials from the beginning of a new semester, or new learning materials are posted on Moodle Learning Platform weekly.

 

TNA Schedule-2020-2021

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Term 5

September 08 to October 27, 2020 (Orientation Sept 04)

October 29 to December 18, 2020

January 05 to February 26, 2021

March 08 to April 30, 2021

May 04 to June 25, 2021

  • Online Final Report Cards are issued in late October, December, February, April, and June. Online Mid Term Report Cards are issued in late September, November, January, March, and May. In addition, there is ongoing contact with parents regarding student progress.

Online/Virtual Code of Conduct for Computer Use (Acceptable Use Policy)

The school reserves the right to monitor all learning materials in user accounts on the file server in order to determine the appropriateness of computer/internet use when a challenge has arisen. The following processes have been put into place:

  • The Moodle Learning Platform at TNA is intended for educational purposes only. Any use of any tool within course for any other purpose other than the intended educational purpose is prohibited. Students will make absolutely sure that their communications on-line or through the use of e-mail are research-related, respectful, responsible, and ethical.
  • Students can access into “Moodle Learning Platform”, and they must comply the guidelines set by the school Principal, provincial, and federal laws.
  • If the platform is used inappropriately or in a prohibited manner, the Principal reserves the

     right to terminate the registration or suspend the user. There is the possibility of further

     disciplinary action including legal prosecution if the appropriate laws, regulations, or

     contracts deem it necessary.

  • Students will not seek out or transmit materials that are racist, sexist, pornographic, homophobic, or dangerous, that contain portrayals of illegal acts, or that are against any school policy. Malicious platform damage, interference or mischief will be reported to the appropriate authorities.
  • Students will NOT give out personal information such as address, telephone number, or parents' work numbers without the permission of a teacher or staff at school. In addition, students will not give out personal information about other people.
  • All activities in an online environment are public. The school reserves the right to monitor all material that is placed in a user's account and to remove it if deemed necessary.
  • For the security purpose of the online environment, the student user must not reveal his/her password to any individual except his/her parent.
  • Please report the principal any unethical issues which may occur via email communications or chat messages from other users.
  • Never attempt to access unauthorized material or to impersonate another user. Any attempt to vandalize, harm or destroy data of another user is prohibited. Any attempt to vandalize the data of the course or school is also prohibited.

Course Content

In our Online Program/Courses:

  • The teachers and admin staff prepare the online course documentations based on school’s course outline, course of study and Ontario course curriculum.
  • The course content is 110 hours of planned learning activities where curriculum documents permit (approximate time allocations accompany course units and/or activities).
  • The course is developed in a way that teacher support for the delivery of curriculum expectation is assured.
  • The designed students’ activities can be tracked through regular and ongoing communications.
  • The course demonstrates evidence of ongoing teaching and learning activities involving the teacher and students at different times or at the same time.
  • Course content includes activities to meet and asses/evaluates oral communication expectations where applicable.
  • Varied assessment strategies are designed over the duration of the course that includes contributions to online discussion groups, completion of online assignments, projects and presentations (Zoom Webinars, real time videos or audio recorded presentations, and email submission assignments.
  • The designed evidence is gathered from three different sources: observations, conversations and student product.
  • The designed evidence from observation is gathered from discussion areas, video evidence, and real-time communication.
  • Student products (student projects, group and individual work) are available and accessible online.
  • Discussion areas, chat rooms and real-time communication tools are used to clarify learning goals.
  • Ongoing descriptive feedback is provided online.
  • There is an online evidence of peer and self-assessment though such tools as checklists, peer reviews to provide descriptive feedback in discussion areas and electronic portfolios used to gather self-assessment.

The teachers provide the online course based on school’s course outline and Ontario curriculum for 110 hours. They track student’s activities through regular and ongoing communications. The teachers design varied assessment strategies and evidence is gathered by the teachers. They need to provide ongoing descriptive feedback online and online evidence of peer and self-assessment.

 Acceptable Use Policy

We will officially begin the semester on September 15, 2020. Please review the course outline as it highlights important aspects of the course such as units of study and marking breakdown. Please also consider the following course policies in order to succeed in the course.

  • Attendance: Regular attendance is of paramount importance in any learning environment. So, the Principal keep attendance records and check students’/teachers’ logins on a regular basis.
  • Safe School Environment: TNA puts much effort to provide a safe learning environment for all learners, so deferring to a person’s dignity and self-esteem is important. Further, submitting inappropriate electronic materials is not permitted. All students should comply code of behavior and are expected to treat other student, teachers and admin staff with respect and courtesy. Threats, distasteful remarks, abuse of any kind, or harassment by any individual which deteriorates the health and welfare of any student or staff member is not permitted.
  • Academic Integrity: Academic Integrity is the moral code or ethical policy of academia. This includes values such as avoidance of cheating or plagiarism; maintenance of academic standards; honesty and rigor in research and academic publishing. Toronto Nobel Academy is committed to ensuring the integrity and validity of student achievement within its courses by promoting academic honesty among its students. Students are responsible for upholding integrity and will be held accountable for the quality of their work and actions. Cheating, distributing, copying or receiving answers for submitting assignments, tests, quizzes and the final exams as Academic Dishonesty will not be tolerated.
  • Late Submission Penalty: Due to the nature of online courses, there is no late submission penalty for the online activities. For each task, you are given a suggested deadline which you are encouraged to meet. While submitting late work has no impact on the mark you earn, it impacts our teachers’ assessments of your learning skills and work habits.
  • Plagiarism: You must give credit to any work that is not yours. You can use APA or MLA as your referencing style. A work that is plagiarized will be returned to you without a mark. You will be required to do it again until it is truly a reflection of your own work.
  • Online Discussions (Asynchronous): There will be a few online discussions throughout the semester. You are required to participate in them. Be reminded that this is an online community so you should have out most respect in your writing language towards your fellow classmates and any other online user. Any remark that is deemed offensive will be removed, so the Principal and school administration will follow up with you with regard to this issue.

    Our teachers do their best to respond to your inquiries in a timely manner. However, there is a 48-hour buffer for teachers to respond to a student inquiry. This is especially the case for the weekends and holiday.

 Hardware and Software Requirements

Moodle is an online Integrated Learning Platform and requires an internet connection to be accessed. In order to login and use the service your browser is required to have JavaScript, Flash 9+, and Cookies enabled. Furthermore, desktops are required to have Adobe Flash Player 10.1, or greater, installed.

Moodle Learning Platform is supported on the following Internet Browsers*:

Desktop Browser Support:

Browser

Supported Browser Version(s)

Maintenance Browser Version(s)**

Internet Explorer

11+ (For Windows 8 and previous versions)

9

Firefox

Latest

n/a

Chrome

Latest

n/a

Safari

10 and 11

5.1

Edge

For Windows 10+

n/a

*Please refer to your specific browsers system requirements to determine the appropriate hardware and software requirements for the browser. **Maintenance Browser Versions are currently supported but will lose support in the near future.

Tablet/Mobile Browser/Operating System Support:

Device

Operating System

Browser

Supported Browser Version(s)

Android

Android 4.4

Android

Latest

Apple

iOS 9 or above

Safari

Latest

Some courses also require the use of additional software such as Microsoft Office Suite, Adobe Acrobat, and more. Some courses may require additional hardware such as a camera, microphone, or speakers.

Student and Teacher Timetables

  • All courses are a minimum of 110 hours of instructional time in length and are worth one credit with the exception of .5 credit as mandated in Ministry regulations. Our school is open from 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. there are classes both in the morning and in the afternoon. The school operates on a three-period a day cycle. Fulltime students take four courses each term. There are three terms in a school year.

Teachers and Other School Staff Members

Under the leadership of the principal, teachers and other school staff members maintain order in the school and are expected to hold everyone to the highest standard of respectful and responsible behavior. As role models, TNA teachers and school staff uphold these high standards when they:

help students work to their full potential and develop their sense of self-worth;

empower students to be positive leaders in their classroom, school, and community;

communicate regularly and meaningfully with parents;

maintain consistent standards of behaviour for all students;

demonstrate respect for all students, staff, parents, volunteers, and the members of the school community;

prepare students for the full responsibilities of citizenship.

 Attendance (In-Classes)

Regular attendance at school is critical for the student’s learning and achievement of course expectations. To encourage regular attendance by students, our school will ensure that students and their parents are informed about the school’s policy on attendance through the school’s course calendar. Where, in the principal’s judgement, a student’s frequent absences from school are jeopardizing his or her successful completion of a course, school staff will meet with the student and the parents to explain the potential consequences of the absences, including failure to gain credits, and discuss steps that could be taken to improve attendance. All Late and Absence Time will be completed by the student in order to maintain the integrity of 110 hours for each course of study for credit purposes.

Attendance (Online Courses)

 Regular attendance in any learning environment is of paramount importance to school success. Courses content and learning activities have been designed to be 110 hours for all full credit courses or 55 hours for all half credit courses. Log in and log out times will be recorded through the online platform. Completion of activities found on the platform will be checked by the instructor. Students who do not participate in their online course regularly will diminish their learning experience.

The following processes have been put into place to encourage regular attendance by the student:

  • The Principal will maintain attendance records as it is expected that students and teachers should login to their course on a regular basis. Students and/or parents will be contacted if they have not logged in within a month's time.
  • Students should maintain log of online and offline activities.
  • Students who leave a course before completion must communicate their intentions either in writing to the principal or over the phone in the interest of up-to-date record keeping, before any request can be acted upon.
  • To encourage attendance, the principal will work with the curriculum writers, to set manageable assessment and evaluation assignments early in the course, in order to give the student positive feedback and breakdown any existing technology barriers.
  • Students who have not completed their course within 6 months from the day of enrollment in that course, will be automatically unenrolled from the course.
  • For Synchronous Model: The teacher teaches in real time with students online via Zoom webinars and all students must attend their Zoom/Hybrid classes. The teacher communicates with students through webcam/camera and finally the teacher records the session.
  • For Asynchronous Model: The teacher posts offline materials from the beginning of a new semester, or new learning materials are posted on Moodle Learning Platform daily or weekly. All students must log in three times weekly. All teachers check students’ Learning Log and depending on the types of activities, teachers spend hours on the assigned activities. Teachers also give feedback to students via email or chat message.
  • If the students fail to log in 3 times, they will be received the first notice. If the students fail to log in 6 times, they will be received the second notice. Ultimately, 8 logs in failures results in dropping the course.

Note: The principal is committed to inform start and end date of the course (Mid/Final terms, and withdrawal).

 

Roles and Responsibilities

Toronto Nobel Academy Code of Conduct

The purpose of this code of conduct is:

  • to establish and maintain safe, caring and orderly environments for purposeful learning
  • to establish and maintain appropriate balances among individual and collective rights, freedoms and responsibilities
  • to clarify and publish expectations for student behaviour while at school, while going to and from school, and while attending any school function or activity at any location.

Acceptable Conduct:

  • Attend school each day, arriving on time for all classes.
  • Attend Zoom/Hybrid classes regularly for online classes (Synchronous Model).
  • Log in three times weekly for online classes (Asynchronous Model)
  • Attend all classes and complete the work assigned in those classes.
  • Be cooperative, courteous and respectful in dealings with administrators, teachers, school staff and other students.
  • Carry out directions given by school staff.
  • Take care of the books, equipment and learning materials provided for their use.
  • Treat the school building, grounds and equipment with care and prevent litter.
  • Respect the rights of others. Don't take things that don't belong to you and don't threaten or interfere with other students.
  • Demonstrate the highest standards of conduct and good judgment when involved in school sponsored events.
  • Have no contact with alcohol, drugs, weapons, or replica weapons while at school, on the school grounds or in attendance at any school sponsored event in the community.
  • Act as responsible members of the school neighbourhood, by being courteous to people living in the area, by refraining from disturbing or disrupting their daily activities and by being respectful of their property.
  • Adhere to this Code of Conduct while traveling to and from school and while off the school premises during the lunch hour or at other times during the school day.

Unacceptable Conduct:

behaviors that:

  • interfere with the learning of others
  • interfere with an orderly environment
  • create unsafe conditions

acts of:

  • bullying, harassment or intimidation
  • physical violence
  • retribution against a person who has reported incidents

illegal acts, such as:

  • possession, use or distribution of illegal or restricted substances (alcohol/drugs)
  • possession or use of weapons
  • theft of or damage to property

Consequences:

The severity and frequency of unacceptable conduct as well as the age and maturity of students is considered in determining appropriate disciplinary action.
• responses to unacceptable conduct are pre-planned, fair, and consistent, while reflective of the particular circumstances of each individual case
• disciplinary action, wherever possible, is preventative and restorative, rather than
merely punitive
• students, as often as possible, are encouraged to participate in the development of
meaningful consequences for violations of the established code of conduct

Notification:

School administrators and counselors may have a responsibility to advise other parties of serious breaches of the code of conduct. For example:

  • parents of student offender(s) – in every instance
  • parents of student victim(s) – in every instance
  • police and/or other agencies – as required by law
  • all parents – when deemed to be important to reassure members of the school community that school officials are aware of a serious situation or incident and are taking appropriate action to address it.

The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)

The requirements for earning an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) are as follows:

  • students must earn a minimum of 30 credits, including 18 compulsory credits and 12 optional credits;
  • students must meet the provincial secondary school literacy requirement; and
  • students must complete 40 hours of community involvement activities.

There is the requirement to remain in Secondary School until the age of 18 or until the student has acquired the OSSD.

 Compulsory Credits (Total of 18)

In order to obtain the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, students must earn a total of 18 compulsory credits.

4 Credits in English (1 credit per grade)

  • The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) may be used to meet either the Grade 11 or the Grade 12 English compulsory credit requirement.
  • The Grade 11 Contemporary Aboriginal Voices course may be used to meet the Grade 11 English compulsory credit requirement.
  • For English language learners, the requirement may be met through earning a maximum of 3 credits in English as a second language (ESL) or English literacy development (ELD); the fourth credit must be a Grade 12 compulsory English course.
  • 3 credits in mathematics (at least 1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)
  • 2 credits in science
  • 1 credit in the arts
  • The Grade 9 Expressing Aboriginal Cultures course may be used to meet the compulsory credit

requirement in the arts.

  • 1 credit in Canadian geography (Grade 9)
  • 1 credit in Canadian history (Grade 10)
  • 1 credit in French as a second language
  • • Students who have taken Native languages in place of French as a second language in elementary school may use a Level 1 or 2 Native language course to meet the compulsory credit requirement for French as a second language.
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 0.5 credit in career studies
  • 0.5 credit in civics
  • 3 additional credits, consisting of 1 credit from each of the following groups:

Group 1: English (including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course), French as a second language, classical languages, international languages, Native languages, Canadian and world studies, Native studies, social sciences and humanities, guidance and career education, cooperative education.

Group 2: French as a second language, the arts, business studies, health and physical education, and cooperative education.

Group 3: French as a second language, science (Grade 11 or 12), computer studies, technological education, and cooperative education.

Note: The following conditions apply to selections from the above three groups:

  •  A maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language may count as additional compulsory credits, 1 credit from Group 1, and 1 credit from either Group 2 or Group 3.
  •  A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education may count as additional compulsory credits, selected from any of Groups 1, 2, or 3.

While the school board and principal may recommend that students take certain courses in addition to the required subjects, they may not identify additional subjects or courses as compulsory requirements towards the earning of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

Optional Credits (total of 12)

In addition to the 18 compulsory credits, students must earn 12 optional credits.

Students earn these credits by successfully completing courses that they have selected from the courses listed as available in their school’s program and course calendar.

The Secondary School Literacy Graduation Requirement

 All students are required to meet the secondary school literacy graduation requirement in order to earn an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). The requirement is based on the expectations for reading and writing throughout the Ontario curriculum up to and including Grade 9. The purpose of the secondary school literacy graduation requirement is to determine whether students have the skills in reading and writing that they will need to succeed in school, at work, and in daily life. To meet this requirement, students are expected to take and successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) in Grade 10. Once students have successfully completed the OSSLT, they may not retake it. Students who do not successfully complete the OSSLT will have additional opportunities to meet the literacy graduation requirement, the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC), or the adjudication process. Mature students have the option to enrol directly in the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course without first attempting the OSSLT. They may still elect to meet the literacy graduation requirement by successfully completing the OSSLT.

The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT)

 The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) is the usual method for assessing the literacy skills of students in Ontario for the purpose of determining whether they meet the provincial secondary school literacy requirement for graduation. The test thus identifies students who have demonstrated the required skills in literacy as well as those who have not demonstrated the required skills and will need to do further work. The test identifies the specific areas in which these latter students need remediation. The test is scheduled by and administered through the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) once each year, usually in the spring.

Students will usually take the OSSLT in the school year following the school year in which they enter Grade 9, unless a deferral is granted by the principal. Deferrals are granted in accordance with the policies described in Appendix 3, Section 3. Students who do not successfully complete the OSSLT will have opportunities to retake the test in subsequent years, on dates scheduled by the EQAO. Once students have successfully completed the OSSLT, they may not retake it.

Students who are English language learners may be entitled to special provisions as outlined in Appendix 3, Section 2. For students with special education needs, accommodations specified in the student’s IEP must be available on the day of the test. A student will take the OSSLT in the language of instruction of the school in which he or she is enrolled at the time the test is administered. School boards should ensure that this policy is made known to students and to parents of students who are planning to transfer from the English-language system to the French-language system, or vice versa, and who have not yet fulfilled the literacy graduation requirement. A student who has successfully completed the OSSLT in either English or French at the student’s previous board is considered to have met the literacy graduation requirement and will not have to retake the test in the other language after transferring to the receiving board.

School boards are required to provide remedial assistance for students who do not complete the test successfully. This remedial assistance should be designed to help students improve their skills so that they are better prepared to retake the literacy test. For example, a board could offer a credit course on learning strategies (see the guidance and career education curriculum policy document) or one on literacy skills (see the English curriculum policy document) for these students. For students who entered Grade 9 in the 1999–2000 school years, successful completion of the test was not required. However, for those students who took the field test of the OSSLT in 2000–2001, failed the test, and chose to retake the OSSLT in October 2001, successful completion of the provincial literacy graduation requirement became a diploma requirement.

The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC)

 Policy requirements for taking the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) are contained in the curriculum policy document The Ontario Curriculum: English – The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC), Grade 12. Students who pass the course are considered to have met the literacy graduation requirement. The reading and writing competencies required by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) form the instructional and assessment core of the course. The course differs from other courses in that it outlines specific requirements for evaluation in order to ensure alignment with the requirements of the OSSLT. If a student has had two opportunities to take the OSSLT and has failed it at least once, the student is eligible to enrol in the OSSLC. (Principals have the discretion to allow a student to enrol in the OSSLC before he or she has had a second opportunity to take the OSSLT, if the principal determines that it is in the best educational interest of the student (Not applicable for private school).

The credit earned for successfully completing the OSSLC may also be used to meet the Grade 11 or the Grade 12 compulsory credit requirement in English or to meet the Group 1 compulsory credit requirement for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. A student cannot be granted credit for the OSSLC through the challenge process from the Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition policy. For students with special education needs, accommodations specified in the student’s IEP must be available to the student throughout the course. However, because achievement of the expectations in this course represents fulfilment of the literacy requirement for graduation, no modifications of the expectations are permitted. Students who were receiving special education programs and/or services and had an IEP documenting accommodations required during the taking of the OSSLT may be eligible to enrol directly in the OSSLC if the required accommodations were not available on the day the OSSLT was administered. (The accommodations must be in accordance with those outlined in Appendix 3, Section 1, under the subheading “Permitted Accommodations”.) In such cases, the student must have been present to take the test but the required accommodations, or a reasonable alternative to them, were unavailable to the student during the whole test or part of the test.

The 40-Hour Community Involvement Requirement

 Students must complete a minimum of 40 hours of community involvement activities as part of the diploma requirements. The purpose of this requirement is to encourage students to develop an awareness and understanding of civic responsibility and of the role they can play and the contributions they can make in supporting and strengthening their communities. Students will plan and select their community involvement activities in consultation with their parents and as part of the Individual Pathways Plan process (see section 2.4). Although this diploma requirement applies to students in Grades 9 to 12, students in Grade 8 will now be able to start accumulating community involvement hours in the summer before they enter Grade 9. (The details to support implementation of this change will be in a forthcoming revision of PPM No. 124a). For mature students, principals will determine the number of hours of community involvement activities required.

 Substitutions for Compulsory Credit Requirements

 In order to provide the flexibility to tailor an individual student’s program to the student’s needs and to support his or her progress through secondary school, principals may substitute up to three compulsory credits with courses from other subject areas specified in the list of compulsory credit requirements (including Groups 1, 2 and 3). Substitutions should be made to promote and enhance student learning or to respond to special needs and interests. Two half-credit courses may be used through substitution to meet one compulsory credit requirement (counted as one substitution); one full-credit course may be used through substitution to meet the two compulsory half-credit requirements of civics and career studies (also counted as one substitution). The decision to substitute one course for another for a student should be made only if the student’s educational interests are best served by such a substitution. If a parent or an adult student (a student who is eighteen years of age or older) requests a substitution, the principal will determine whether the substitution should be made. A principal may also initiate consideration of whether a substitution should be made. The principal will make his or her decision in consultation with the parent or the adult student and appropriate school staff.

The following are limitations on substitutions for compulsory credits:

  • English as a second language and English literacy development courses may not be used to substitute for a compulsory credit. (They may be used, however, to meet the compulsory credit requirements for three English credits)
  • No more than one learning strategies course, from the guidance and career education curriculum policy document, may be used through substitution to meet a compulsory credit requirement.
  • Credits earned for cooperative education courses may not be used through substitution to meet compulsory credit requirements.
  • A locally developed compulsory credit (LDCC) course may not be used as a substitute for a compulsory credit; it may be used only to meet the compulsory credit requirement that it has been designed to meet.

Each substitution will be noted on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript.

 The Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC)

 The Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) will be granted, on request, to students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

To be granted an OSSC, a student must have earned a minimum of 14 credits, distributed as follows.

 7 Required Compulsory Credits

  • 2 credits in English
  • 1 credit in mathematics
  • 1 credit in science
  • 1 credit in Canadian history or Canadian geography
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 1 credit in the arts, computer studies, or technological education

 7 Required Optional Credits

  • 7 credits selected by the student from available courses

The provisions for making substitutions for compulsory credits described in section 6.2 also apply to the Ontario Secondary School Certificate.

 The Certificate of Accomplishment

 Students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. The Certificate of Accomplishment may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain kinds of further training, or who plan to find employment directly after leaving school. The Certificate of Accomplishment is to be accompanied by the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. For students who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP), a copy of the IEP may be included. Students who return to school to complete additional credit and non-credit courses (including courses with modified or alternative expectations in special education programs) will have their transcript updated accordingly but will not be issued a new Certificate of Accomplishment. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma or Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted when the returning student has fulfilled the appropriate requirements. The secondary school program is designed to provide all students with the fundamental knowledge and skills they will need in any area of endeavour as well as the opportunity to specialize in and/or explore areas related to their postsecondary goals and personal interests. This program keeps options open for students in the earlier grades and prepares them in senior grades for their postsecondary destinations, including apprenticeship training, college, community living, university, or the workplace. Course selection for students under the age of eighteen must be made with parental approval, except in the case of sixteen- or seventeen-year-old students who have withdrawn from parental control. Students are supported in making informed decisions about their secondary school program through the development of their Individual Pathways Plan.

Secondary School Credits

 A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion (that is, completion with a final percentage mark of 50 per cent or higher) of a course that has been scheduled for a minimum of 110 hours. Credits are granted by a principal on behalf of the Minister of Education for courses that have been developed or authorized by the ministry. A half-credit may be granted for each 55-hour part of a 110-hour ministry-developed course. Most courses are offered as single-credit courses. Some courses, such as technological education, interdisciplinary studies, and cooperative education courses, may be offered as multiple-credit courses. For the purpose of granting a credit, scheduled time is defined as the time during which students participate in planned learning activities designed to lead to the achievement of the curriculum expectations of a course. Planned learning activities include interaction between the teacher and the student and assigned individual or group work (other than homework) related to the achievement of the learning through classroom or e-learning instruction and activities and/or through community placements related to work experience and cooperative education.

 Secondary School Courses in the Ontario Curriculum

 Secondary school courses in the Ontario curriculum are organized by discipline, grade, and course type. Course types offered in Grades 9 and 10 (academic and applied courses, open courses) differ from those offered in Grades 11 and 12 (destination-related courses, open courses) in the current Ontario curriculum, there is a clear distinction between applied and academic courses in Grades 9 and 10, as well as among the various destination and open courses in Grades 11 and 12. Open courses in Grades 9 to 12 are also distinct from other course types. Because the courses are different, students may earn credit for the successful completion of more than one course in the same subject at any given grade level. All schools will offer both a sufficient number of courses and courses of appropriate types to enable students to meet the diploma requirements. Schools are not expected to offer all courses in all course types, but must provide a range of choices appropriate to the needs and interests of their students.

 Grades 9 and 10 Courses

The following three types of courses are offered in Grades 9 and 10:

  • Academic courses develop students’ knowledge and skills through the study of theory and abstract problems. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate.
  • Applied courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and develop students’ knowledge and skills through practical applications and concrete examples. Familiar situations are used to illustrate ideas, and students are given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts and theories they study.
  • Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind. In Grades 9 and 10, students will select an appropriate combination of academic, applied, and open courses in order to add to their knowledge and skills, explore their interests, and determine the type of educational program they are best suited to undertake in Grades 11 and 12. When selecting their courses in Grades 9 and 10, students are not expected to make binding decisions about particular educational expectations in the course. or career pathway; however, they should try to ensure that they have the prerequisites required for future courses they plan to take.

In order to meet the needs of their student community, school boards must offer both academic and applied courses in the following curriculum areas: English, mathematics, science, history, geography, and French as a second language.

 Grades 11 and 12 Courses

 The following five types of courses are offered in Grades 11 and 12:

  • College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for most college programs or for admission to specific apprenticeship or other training programs.
  • University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs.
  • University/college preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific programs offered at universities and colleges.
  • Workplace preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the expectations of employers, if they plan to enter the workforce directly after graduation, or the requirements for admission to certain apprenticeship or other training programs.
  • Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind.

In Grades 11 and 12, students will focus increasingly on their individual interests and will identify and prepare for their postsecondary pathways. In these grades, there are also increased opportunities for learning experiences beyond the school, including cooperative education, work experience, and specialized programs such as the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program, Specialist High Skills Major programs, and school-work transition programs. School boards are required to ensure that students in Grades 11 and 12 have access to an appropriate destination-related course in at least English, mathematics, and science, in accordance with the course types included in the curriculum policy documents for these disciplines. Planned learning activities will be delivered.

 The Course Coding System

The course code consists of a course title and a six-character code. The first five characters are designated by the Ministry of Education. The sixth character is '1" determined by the school. Normally it is '1" and does not appear on the Ontario Student Transcript.

Code Characters                        Explanation                                               Example ENG1D

1st, 2nd, and 3rd

Subject discipline of the course in letters

"ENG" indicates an English course

4th

Grade level as a number * (see below)

"1" grade 9

"2" grade 10

"3" grade 11

"4" grade 12

" 1" grade 9 or first year

ENG1

5th

Type of course as a letter

"C" College Preparation (grades 11 and 12)

"D" Academic (grades 9 and 10) "T" Locally Developed

"M" University/College Preparation (grades 11 and 12) "O" Open (all grades)

"P" Applied (grades 9 and 10) "U" University Preparation (grades 11 and 12)

"W" Workplace Preparation

(grades 11 and 12

"D" Academic course

ENG1D

6th

Board or school designated character that indicates credit value or used to differentiate between courses with similar codes

ENG1D1

 Access to Outlines of the Courses of Study

  • Outlines of Courses of Study are available in the Principal’s office for your review.
  • Students gain access to Outlines of the Courses of Study via “Moodle Learning Platform” as a viable electronic source.

Access to Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents:

  • Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents are available in the school for your review. As well, the Ontario Ministry of Education Website has these documents available for your perusal.

Withdrawal from a Course

Withdrawals occurring within 5 days of the issuing of the Mid-Term card from the Toronto Nobel Academy will result in the mark not being recorded. A withdrawal from a Grade 11 or 12 course after 5 days of the issuing of the Mid-Term card results in a "W" being entered in the "Credit" column of the OST along with the mark at the time of the withdrawal. Withdrawals from Grade 9 or 10 courses are not recorded on the OST. If there are extraordinary circumstances relating to a student's withdrawal from a course, an "S" may be entered in the "Note" column on the OST.

Procedures for Students Who Wish to Change Course Types

 Some students may change their educational goals as they proceed through secondary school. When they decide to embark on a new pathway, they may find that they have not completed all of the prerequisite courses they need. Schools must make provisions to allow students to make such changes of direction and must clearly describe these provisions in their school program/course calendar. In most cases, a student may enrol in a different type of course in a given subject in Grade 10 than the type he or she completed in Grade 9, although doing so may require additional preparation, as recommended by the principal. In the case of mathematics, however, the sole prerequisite for the Grade 10 academic mathematics course is the Grade 9 academic mathematics course, so a student who is planning to move from the Grade 9 applied mathematics course to the Grade 10 academic mathematics course must take either the designated transfer course or the Grade 9 academic mathematics course. In Grades 10 to 12, a student may change to a different type of course in a given subject provided that the student has taken any course specified as a prerequisite for that course. If the student has not done so, he or she may take one of the specified prerequisite courses through summer school, night school, e-learning, the Independent Learning Centre, or independent study. If the principal believes that a student can be successful in a particular course without having taken the specified prerequisite course, the principal may waive the prerequisite.

 Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR)

 Prior learning includes the knowledge and skills that students have acquired, in both formal and informal ways, outside Ontario secondary school classrooms. Through a formal evaluation and accreditation process known as Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR), students enrolled in Ontario secondary schools, including the Independent Learning Centre and inspected private schools that choose to implement PLAR, may have their skills and knowledge evaluated against the overall expectations outlined in provincial curriculum policy documents in order to earn credits towards the secondary school diploma. PLAR procedures are carried out under the direction of the school principal, who grants the credits. The PLAR process developed by a school board in compliance with ministry policy involves two components: challenge and equivalency. The challenge process is the process whereby students’ prior learning is assessed for the purpose of granting credit for a course developed from a provincial curriculum policy document. The equivalency process involves the assessment of credentials from other jurisdictions.

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) for Regular Day School Students

 Because young people benefit in many ways from the learning experiences offered in secondary school, PLAR has a specific, limited function in the Ontario secondary school program. For regular day school students, a maximum of 4 credits may be granted through the challenge process for Grade 10, 11, and 12 courses; or for Levels 1, 2, and 3 in classical languages courses; for Levels 2, 3, and 4 in international languages courses; and for Levels 3, 4, and 5 in Native languages courses. No more than 2 of these credits may be granted in one discipline. For students who are transferring from home schooling, a non-inspected private school, or a school outside Ontario, principals will grant equivalency credits for placement purposes based on their evaluation of the student’s previous learning PLAR procedures must also be available to exceptional students. Assessment strategies must be adapted for this group in keeping with their special needs; for example, extra time might be allowed for the completion of work, or a quiet environment might be provided for activities. While PLAR may be of benefit to some gifted students, it is not intended to be used as a replacement for or alternative to enriched or other special programs for gifted students.

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) for Mature Students 11

Because of the broader life experience of mature students, the requirements concerning the application of PLAR procedures are different for them than for regular day school students. Principals will determine the number of credits, including compulsory credits that a mature student needs to meet the credit requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). At the discretion of the principal, up to 16 Grade 9 and 10 equivalency credits may be granted to a mature student following an individual assessment. Mature students may earn 10 of the 14 remaining Grade 11 and 12 credits needed to meet diploma requirements in three ways: (1) they may demonstrate achievement of the required secondary school curriculum expectations and receive credit through the challenge process; (2) they may present education and/or training credentials for assessment through the equivalency process; or (3) they may take the course. It should be noted that Levels 2 and 3 in classical languages are equivalent to Grades 11 and 12, respectively; that Levels 3 and 4 in international languages are equivalent to Grades 11 and 12, respectively; and that Levels 4 and 5 in Native languages are equivalent to Grades 11 and 12, respectively. Mature students must earn a minimum of 4 Grade 11 and 12 credits by taking the course at a secondary school (or through any of the options outlined in section 10). Mature students who have previously accumulated 26 or more credits towards the diploma must successfully complete the required number of courses to bring their total number of credits up to 30 before they will be eligible to receive the OSSD. Mature students working towards the OSSD under OS/OSS must also satisfy the diploma requirements with regard to the provincial secondary school literacy requirement. Principals will determine the number of hours of community involvement activities that a mature student will have to complete.

Equivalent Credits

 Out of province students or transfers from non-inspected private schools may be granted equivalent credits upon the Principal's evaluation of previous learning. "Equivalent Credits" are entered in the "Course Title" column. "QSE" entered in the "Course Code" column. "EQV" in the "Percentage Grade" column. The total number of credits entered into the "Credit" column.

And the number of compulsory credits entered into the "Compulsory" column.

Procedures for Students Who Fail to Meet Course Expectations

 Where a student does not achieve the curriculum expectations of a course, the principal and teaching staff, in consultation with the parents and the student, will determine what type of program would best enable the student to meet the expectations and earn credit for the course. Students should be allowed to repeat only the material relating to the expectations not achieved, providing that the eligibility requirements for credit recovery are met. Alternatively, the student may repeat the entire course. A student who fails or withdraws from a compulsory credit course should be informed of the consequences for meeting diploma requirements. The program options available to meet the requirements should be outlined, and possible alternative courses identified.

  • Note – Private Schools are not permitted to offer credit recovery programs. However, we want you to know the procedure in the Public-School systems.

 

Credit Recovery

Boards and schools should make credit recovery programs available to their students. These programs are designed to help regular day school students meet the expectations of a course they have completed but for which they have received a failing grade. A credit (or credits) for a course must be recovered within two years from the time the student fails the course. Students may work on recovering more than one credit at a time through the credit recovery process, and there is no limit on the number of credits a student may recover. Credit recovery may be delivered as part of the regular day school program and/ or at summer school. Instruction must be delivered by a qualified teacher. Credit recovery programs may accommodate continuous intake and may be delivered through e-learning. Procedures and requirements governing the operation of credit recovery programs are outlined in Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools – First Edition, Covering Grades 1 to 12.

 Repetition of a Course

  • Students who repeat a Grade 11 or 12 course that they have previously completed successfully earn only one credit for the course. However, each attempt and the percentage grade obtained is recorded on the OST and an 'R ' is entered in the Credit column for the course(s) with the lower percentage.

 Course Prerequisites

 Courses in Grades 10, 11, and 12 may have prerequisites for enrolment. All prerequisite courses are identified in ministry curriculum policy documents, and no courses apart from these may be identified as prerequisites. Schools must provide parents and students with clear and accurate information about prerequisites. If a parent or an adult student (a student who is eighteen years of age or older) requests that a prerequisite be waived, the principal will determine whether or not the prerequisite should be waived. A principal may also initiate consideration of whether a prerequisite should be waived. The principal will make his or her decision in consultation with the parent or the adult student and appropriate school staff.

Evaluation and Examination Policies

 Assessment and Evaluation

Assessment and Evaluation Principles and Practices are based on Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting in Ontario Schools, First Edition, Covering Grades 1 to 12, 2010, accessible at: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/policyfunding/growSuccess.pdf

The primary purpose of assessment is to improve students’ learning. Assessment must relate directly to the expectations for the course and be clearly presented.

A variety of assessments for and as learning are conducted on a regular basis to allow ample opportunities for students to improve and ultimately demonstrate their full range of learning and in order for the teacher to gather information to provide feedback. Assessment tasks relate to the learning goals and the success criteria set out in lesson plans. Success Criteria describe in specific terms what successful attainment of the learning goals looks like.

Evaluation is the process of judging the quality of student work in relation to the achievement chart categories and criteria and assigning a percentage grade to represent that quality. Evaluation is based on gathering evidence of student achievement through:

  • Products
  • Observations
  • Conversations

Weighting of Categories

Students will be assessed and evaluated according to the following four categories (and their respective weighting): The weighting of categories varies depending on the subject discipline.

In this course of study, the weighting is:

Knowledge and Understanding (25%)

Subject-specific content acquired in each course (knowledge), and the comprehension of its meaning and significance (understanding).

Thinking (25%)

The use of critical and creative thinking skills and/or processes as follows:

Planning skills, (e.g., generating ideas, gathering information, focusing research, organizing information)

Processing skills (e.g., drawing inferences, interpreting, analyzing, synthesizing, evaluating)

Critical/creative thinking processes (e.g. oral discourse, research, critical analysis, critical literacy, meta-cognition, creative process)

Communication (25%)

The conveying of meaning through various forms, including oral, written and visual.

Application (25%)

The use of knowledge and skills to make connections within and between various context – both familiar and new.

There are three important forms of assessment and evaluation which will be employed during the course:

Assessment for Learning:

  1. Diagnostic assessment occurs at the beginning of the teaching/learning cycle. It provides information about students’ prior knowledge and skills as well as their collective and individual strengths and needs. Curriculum plans may be modified on this basis.

Assessment as Learning:

  1. Formative assessment (and evaluation) occurs during the teaching/learning cycle. It provides information about students’ progress, to that particular point, in order to inform further steps for teaching and learning. This includes not only teacher but also peer feedback and self-evaluation, i.e., Assessment as Learning.

Assessment of Learning:

  1. Summative assessment and evaluation occurs at the end of the teaching/learning cycle. It provides students with opportunities to demonstrate their achievement of the important/enduring learning addressed during that period of time. It is used to evaluate and describe student growth relative to The Ontario Curriculum expectations and the provincial standards.

In accordance with Ministry guidelines, evaluations carried out during the year will form 70% of the students’ overall grade. This grade will be based on the most consistent level of achievement in each of the four categories noted above, with special regard being given to more recent evidence of achievement. The final evaluation(s) involving all four categories, is worth 30% and will occur towards the end of the course.

Grading

The final grade will be determined as follows:

Seventy percent (70%) of the final grade will be based on assessments and evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade will reflect the student's most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration will be given to more recent evidence of achievement.

Thirty percent (30%) of the grade will be based on a final evaluation administered at the end of the course. This final evaluation will be based on an evaluation of achievement from all four categories of the Achievement Chart for the course and the expectations from all units of the course.

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST)

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) provides a comprehensive record of a student’s overall achievement in high school. The credits that a secondary school student has earned towards fulfilment of the requirements for the graduation diploma will be recorded on the OST.

The transcript, which is part of the Ontario Student Record (OSR), will include the following information:

  • the student’s achievement in Grades 9 and 10, with percentage grades earned and credits gained for successfully completed credit courses.
  • a list of all Grade 11 and 12 courses and Ontario Academic Courses taken or attempted by the student, with the percentage grades earned and the credits gained (students repeating a course for which they have already earned a credit will earn only one credit for the completion of that course.
  • identification of any course that has been substituted for one that is a diploma requirement.
  • confirmation that the student has completed the community involvement requirement.
  • the student’s final result on the provincial secondary school literacy test.
  • an indication of any extraordinary circumstances affecting the student’s achievement in a Grade 11 or 12 course.

Course Availability

  • The school has every intention of delivering the courses listed and described in the course calendar. Due to the small size of the school, this might not always be possible. The school reserves the right to determine whether or not a course will actually run. Staffing and scheduling decisions are based on the best use of academic resources and the number of students who have enrolled in a particular course.

Course Selection Process

  • Students are encouraged to consult with parents, teachers, advisors and administrators, as necessary, to ensure that the appropriate choices have been made in selecting their courses. Please consult course outlines to ensure that you have the course prerequisites.

Course Add and Drop Procedures

  • All course changes, additions and deletions must be made in consultation with teachers, parents, and principal.
  • A timetable change is not official unless approved through this process. Note: if a student in Grade 11 and 12 receives permission to withdraw from a course after the deadline, the student's percentage grade at the time of withdrawal will be entered in the OST and a ‘W’ will appear in the ‘credit earned’ column of the OST.

Support for English Language Learners

  • Support for English Language Learners include accommodations (specific teaching strategies) and program modifications – the principal or the guidance counselor will describe these procedures with you. All teachers adapt their instruction to address students’ different levels of proficiency in English and help students adjust to a new linguistic, cultural, and educational environment.

Technology in the Curriculum

In preparation for further education, employment, citizenship, and lifelong learning, students and teachers must be capable of deriving meaning from information by using a wide variety of information literacy skills. At TNA students will experience firsthand the benefits of a technologically enriched education and thereby acquire skills for the 21st century. Increasing reliance on computers, networks, and information technologies in society makes it essential for students to become computer literate and to develop information literacy skills. Information literacy is the ability to access, find, select, gather, critically evaluate, create, and communicate information. Toronto Nobel Academy places a great deal of emphasis on using the information obtained to solve problems and make decisions.

 Software Programs for Students

As part of their training in computer and information literacy, students should become familiar with a wide range of available software programs. Among the applications that can aid student learning are simulations, multimedia resources, databases, and computer-assisted learning modules, many of which have been developed for use in particular disciplines. Students will also be expected to use software applications that help them develop general skills in such areas as writing, problem solving, research, and communication. It is important that students learn to critically evaluate the accuracy, validity, currency, comprehensiveness, and depth of the information they access using information technology, particularly the Internet. In general, students must acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to allow them to use computer and information technology safely, effectively, confidently, and ethically.

Collaboration Tools for Teachers

The curriculum writers for Toronto Nobel Academy work collaboratively within and across disciplines to effectively plan for the integration of computers and information technologies into the teaching/learning process. As the technology capable of enhancing student learning becomes available, our teachers should, within a reasonable period of time, incorporate that technology into their planning of instruction and learning activities in individual disciplines and, collaboratively, across disciplines. Effective communication programs can also help to promote the development of information literacy skills among all students by supporting and coordinating the collaborative planning and implementation of reading programs, inquiry and research tasks, and independent study.

School Services & Facilities:

  • Individual and small-group tutoring/peer tutoring
  • Educational Counselling
  • University and college information sessions
  • Application assistance to universities and colleges (OUAC/OCAS)
  • OSSLT preparation workshops
  • IELTS Test Centre
  • High speed Internet/Wireless connection
  • In-class resources (books, multimedia)
  • Home Stay Opportunities (International Students)
  • Visa Renewal: The International Office of the school will facilitate renewal of the Canadian Student Authorization, provided that the student is proceeding towards an OSSD or 30 credits at TNA
  • Provide insurance for international students
  • Personal: Opening bank accounts, Application for transit cards, Welcome to New Students, Counseling for Personal Problem
  • Local phone, hot and cold-Water Dispenser, Microwave, Refrigerator

Further, Toronto Nobel Academy:

  • clearly states competencies for students in each course of study;
  • provides a range of career exploration activities within each curriculum;
  • prepares an annual education plan for each student whose OSR is held by TNA;
  • provides to both students and teachers, individual assistance and short-term counseling;
  • provides program of study advice;
  • provides timely information on post-secondary programs to all of its students.
  • TNA current students, whose OSRs are held by TNA, will have Annual Education Plans created in consultation with the student, the student’s parent/guardian when the student is under 18 years of age and the school principal.

 COMMUNITY RESOURCES

Located in the heart of North York, TNA has access to the following community resources:

North York Central Library

5120 Yonge Street

Toronto, ON

M2N 5N9

416-395-5535

Bayview Public Library

2901 Bayview Avenue

North York, ON

M2K 1E6

416-395-5460

Fairview Public Library

35 Fairview Mall Drive

North York, ON

M2J 4S4

416-395-5750

Edithvale Community Centre

7 Edithvale Drive

Toronto, ON

416-395-6164

Toronto Sheppard Ave.

YMCA Centre

567 Sheppard Ave. E.

North York, ON

M2K 1B2

416-225-9622

Earl Bales Community

Centre

4169 Bathurst Street

Toronto, ON

416-395-7873

North York General Hospital

4001 Leslie Street

Toronto, ON

M2K 1E1

416-756-6000

Willowdale Medical Clinic

6023 Yonge Street

Toronto, ON

416-916-2733

Primacy - North York Family

Physicians After Hours Clinic

2901 Bayview Avenue

Toronto, ON

416-491-6338

Children's Aid Society

30 Isabella Street

Toronto, ON

416-924-4646

Bathurst-Finch Community

Food Bank

550 Finch Avenue W.

Toronto, ON

647-704-1111

The Salvation Army

North York Temple

25 Centre Avenue

Toronto, ON

416-225-7968

Centre for Information and

Community Services of

Ontario

80 Sheppard Avenue E.

Toronto, ON

M2N 6E8

St. Stephen's Community

House

5231 Yonge Street

Toronto, ON

M2N 5P8

416-964-8747

Canadian Centre for

Language and Cultural

Studies, Inc

5734 Yonge Street, 2nd Floor

Toronto, ON

M2M 4E7

416-223-6613

Course Description

Information regarding course expectations and achievement chart categories for each curriculum area is available through the Ministry of Education website at www.edu.gov.on.ca. Courses of study are available in the main office of the school.

Courses of Study - September 2020

BUSINESS STUDIES

International Business Fundamentals, Grade 12, University/College Preparation (BBB4M)

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for postsecondary programs in business, including international business, marketing, and management.

Prerequisite: None

 Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals, Grade 12, University/College Preparation (BOH4M)

This course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in managing a successful business. Students will analyse the role of a leader in business, with a focus on decision making, management of group dynamics, workplace stress and conflict, motivation of employees, and planning. Effective business communication skills, ethics, and social responsibility are also emphasized.
Prerequisite: None

CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES

Issues in Canadian Geography, Grade 9, Academic (CGC1D)

This course examines interrelationships within and between Canada’s natural and human systems and how these systems interconnect with those in other parts of the world. Students will explore environmental, economic, and social geographic issues relating to topics such as transportation options, energy choices, and urban development. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate various geographic issues and to develop possible approaches for making Canada a more sustainable place in which to live.

Prerequisite: None

 Civics and Citizenship, Grade 10, Open (CHV2O)

This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.

Prerequisite: None

Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic (CHC2D)

This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.

Prerequisite: None

 ENGLISH

English, Grade 9, Academic (ENG1D)

 This course is designed to develop the oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 academic English course, which leads to university or college preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12.

Prerequisite: None

English, Grade 10, Academic (ENG2D)

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college preparation course.
Prerequisite: English, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

 English, Grade 11, University Preparation (ENG3U)

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, Academic

English, Grade 12, University Preparation (ENG4U)

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 11, University Preparation

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course, Grade 12, Open (OLC4O)

This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation. Students will read a variety of informational, narrative, and graphic texts and will produce a variety of forms of writing, including summaries, information paragraphs, opinion pieces, and news reports. Students will also maintain and manage a portfolio containing a record of their reading experiences and samples of their writing.
Eligibility requirement: Students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the course. (Students who have already met the literacy requirement for graduation may be eligible to take the course under special circumstances, at the discretion of the principal.)

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

 English as a Second Language, ESL Level 3, Open (ESLCO)

This course further extends students’ skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English for a variety of everyday and academic purposes. Students will make short classroom oral presentations; read a variety of adapted and original texts in English; and write using a variety of text forms. As well, students will expand their academic vocabulary and their study skills to facilitate their transition to the mainstream school program. This course also introduces students to the rights and responsibilities inherent in Canadian citizenship, and to a variety of current Canadian issues.

Prerequisite: None

 English as a Second Language, ESL Level 4, Open (ESLDO)

This course prepares students to use English with increasing fluency and accuracy in classroom and social situations and to participate in Canadian society as informed citizens. Students will develop the oral-presentation, reading, and writing skills required for success in all school subjects. They will extend listening and speaking skills through participation in discussions and seminars; study and interpret a variety of grade-level texts; write narratives, articles, and summaries in English; and respond critically to a variety of print and media texts.

Prerequisite: None

English as a Second Language, ESL Level 5, Open (ESLEO)

This course provides students with the skills and strategies they need to make the transition to college and university preparation courses in English and other secondary school disciplines. Students will be encouraged to develop independence in a range of academic tasks. They will participate in debates and lead classroom workshops; read and interpret literary works and academic texts; write essays, narratives, and reports; and apply a range of learning strategies and research skills effectively. Students will further develop their ability to respond critically to print and media texts.

Prerequisite: None

GUIDANCE AND CAREER EDUCATION

Career Studies, Grade 10, Open (GLC2O)

This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work, and community involvement. Students will assess their interests, skills, and characteristics and investigate current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities, and ways to search for work. The course explores postsecondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life transitions, and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan.

Prerequisite: None

MATHEMATICS

Principles of Mathematics, Grade 9, Academic (MPM1D)

This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: None

Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic (MPM 2D)

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: Mathematics, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

 Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation (MCR3U)

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic

 Advanced Functions, Grade 12, University Preparation (MHF4U)

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.

Prerequisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Mathematics for College Technology, Grade 12, College Preparation

Calculus and Vectors, Grade 12, University Preparation (MCV4U)

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course.
Note: Note: The new Advanced Functions course (MHF4U) must be taken prior to or concurrently with Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U).

SCIENCES

Science, Grade 9, Academic (SNC1D)

This course enables students to understand basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics; to develop skills in the processes of scientific inquiry; and to relate science to technology, society, and the environment. Students will learn scientific theories and conduct investigations related to cell division and reproduction; atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; the universe and space exploration; and the principles of electricity.

Prerequisite: None

 Science, Grade 10, Academic (SNC2D)

This course enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society, and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientific investigation skills. Students will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid–base reactions; forces that affect climate and climate change; and the interaction of light and matter.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

 Biology, Grade 11, University Preparation (SBI3U)

This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation.
Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

 Biology, Grade 12, University Preparation (SBI4U)

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.

Prerequisite: Biology, Grade 11, University Preparation

Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation (SCH3U)

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.
Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

 Chemistry, Grade 12, University Preparation (SCH4U)

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

Prerequisite: Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation

Physics, Grade 11, University Preparation (SPH3U)

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Student will study the laws of dynamics and explore different kinds of forces, the quantification and forms of energy (mechanical, sound, light, thermal, and electrical), and the way energy is transformed and transmitted. They will develop scientific-inquiry skills as they verify accepted laws and solve both assigned problems and those emerging from their investigations. Students will also analyze the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

Physics, Grade 12, University Preparation (SPH4U)

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.
Prerequisite: Physics, Grade 11, University Preparation

 SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology, Grade 11, University Preparation (HSP3U)

 This course provides students with opportunities to think critically about theories, questions, and issues related to anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the approaches and research methods used by social scientists. They will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives, to conduct social science research, and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues within the three disciplines.

Prerequisite: The Grade 10 academic course in English, or the Grade 10 academic history course (Canadian and world studies)

Nutrition and Health, Grade 12, University Preparation (HFA4U)

This course examines the relationships between food, energy balance, and nutritional status; the nutritional needs of individuals at different stages of life; and the role of nutrition in health and disease. Students will evaluate nutrition-related trends and will determine how food choices can promote food security and environmental responsibility. Students will learn about healthy eating, expand their repertoire of food-preparation techniques, and develop their social science research skills by investigating issues related to nutrition and health.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

 Challenge and Change in Society, Grade 12, University Preparation (HSB4U)

This course focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives, and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will critically analyse how and why cultural, social, and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyse causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance, and global inequalities. Students will explore ways in which social science research methods can be used to study social change.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

Families in Canada, Grade 12, University Preparation (HHS4U)

This course enables students to draw on sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories and research to analyze the development of individuals, intimate relationships, and family and parent-child relationships. Students will focus on issues and challenges facing individuals and families in Canada’s diverse society. They will develop analytical tools that enable them to assess various factors affecting families and to consider policies and practices intended to support families in Canada. They will develop the investigative skills required to conduct and communicate the results of research on individuals, intimate relationships, and parent-child relationships.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

Take time to talk with our professional staff.

PLAGIARISM and CHEATING

 Academic Dishonesty

Plagiarism is considered a form of cheating. It is the act of taking the ideas or words of another and presenting them as your own. Examples of plagiarism include:

  • failing to acknowledge a source used in researching an assignment
  • failing to footnote or endnote material directly taken from another source
  • completely “lifting” whole sections of someone else’s work
  • purchasing an essay and handing it in as your own work
  • copying assignments, graphics, work of peers, homework, published work (text, periodicals, pamphlets, and recordings), material from Internet websites
  • misrepresenting the ideas of others as your own.

  Cheating

Cheating is the act of using unauthorized materials and/or resources during tests, exams or other Assessment of Learning tasks. Examples of cheating include:

  • giving your own work to others
  • using the work of others
  • using unauthorized study aids
  • copying the work of others on tests or exams

Consequences

Depending on the severity of the incident, the consequences for plagiarism or cheating will reflect a continuum of behavioural and academic responses, based on at least the following four factors:

  • grade level of the student
  • maturity of the student
  • number and frequency of incidents
  • individual circumstances of the student.

Consequences could include:

  • repeating the assignment
  • mark reduction
  • mark of zero
  • suspension

Responsibilities of the Teacher

Teachers are expected to help students avoid plagiarising by:

  • defining the term and reminding them of it when setting out an assignment
  • giving them examples of what constitutes plagiarism
  • emphasizing the importance of using process skills to arrive at a product
  • teaching them research skills so they can avoid plagiarising: note taking, paraphrasing, summarizing
  • teaching them proper formats for footnoting, endnoting and bibliographies
  • teaching them organizational skills: finding and organizing information to build understanding of a topic
  • teaching them how to make an outline for a report or research essay
  • having them keep a learning log to reflect on what they learned through the process: how research and organizational skills helped with the project, how could the product be improved, how can the research and organizational skills be improved
  • assessing the process steps: notes, outline, summary, bibliography, drafts, etc.
  • informing students of the consequences of plagiarism
  • providing students with information about what constitutes plagiarism and cheating
  • designing evaluations which minimize the opportunities for students to plagiarize
  • monitoring the steps in the assignment process to ensure work is being done.

Responsibilities of the Student

Students are expected to:

  • Ensure they are aware and understand the school’s plagiarism/cheating policy.
  • Complete all assignments on time, with care, and without copying the work of another.
  • Complete the steps of the assignment process and submit all rough work.
  • Do not distribute work to others for the purpose allowing them to copy it.

The onus of proof is on the student to verify that his or her assignment is the result of his or her efforts alone.

Appeal

Students may appeal the teacher's decision to the Principal after discussion with the teacher.

Academic Honesty - Plagiarism and Cheating

Toronto Nobel Academy expects that all people in our learning community to behave in an honest manner. Plagiarism is defined in Ministry Policy as the use of the language and thoughts of another without attribution, in order to represent them as one's own original work. The Administrative Team and the teachers will make it clear to students that the evaluations that they complete must be their own work and that cheating and plagiarism will not be condoned. The Administration and the teachers will address the prevention of cheating and plagiarizing by communicating with the parents and the students the process of documentation to be utilized by the school. The teachers may use whatever means of detecting cheating and plagiarism that best supports student achievement and success.

When responding to students who have plagiarized, or cheated, the school will use a clear procedure that considers four mitigating factors when determining the appropriate outcomes and support for the student.

The four factors include:

  • grade level
  • maturity of the student
  • the number and frequency of incidents
  • the individual circumstances of the student

When a student plagiarizes or cheats, the student does not provide evidence of achievement according to the achievement chart in each subject discipline. The Principal and the teacher will choose from a variety of possible responses. Other than Final Evaluation Procedures in University Preparation Courses, the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of the overall expectations in a similar evaluation will be provided. A mark of zero may be a resolution depending on the mitigating factors.

In each instance of Plagiarism and Cheating, there will be a record in the OSR of the event and a record of the decision made and a copy of the letter informing parents of the occurrence and the resolution by the school team.

LATE and MISSED ASSIGNMENTS

Principles

Students are responsible for providing evidence of their achievement of the overall expectations within the time frame specified by the teacher, and in a form approved by the teacher. Students must understand at the outset of the course that there will be consequences for not completing assignments for evaluation or for submitting those assignments late.

The Ministry of Education’s policy states that “the primary purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning”. It follows that deduction of marks for late work does not improve learning nor does it help students who are struggling in school.

Submitting work late is a learning skills issue and is best dealt with in that way. The Ministry requires teachers to separate evaluation of achievement of the curriculum expectations from the development of learning skills and work habits in order to provide students and teachers with good information about academic progress and to clearly identify strengths and weaknesses.

Students submit work late for many reasons and teachers should take into account individual circumstances that recognize:

  • Legitimate explanations
  • Poor time-management skills
  • Lack of academic skills
  • Poor understanding of the assignment
  • Difference between uncharacteristic and repeated behaviours.

Assignments that are consistently late and incomplete are often a demonstration of poor learning skills and should be addressed in the Learning Skills and Work Habits area of the report card. Habitual neglect of deadlines is a behaviour issue that should result in disciplinary action. Late assignments are not necessarily correlated to poor achievement. Therefore, a student should not fail a course or grade based on late penalties.  

Strategies to Support Students

Teachers are expected to develop strategies to help prevent and/or address late and missed assignments including:

  • giving student at least two weeks notice for major assignments and, in setting the due date, ensuring that students are not already pressed for time with competing major assignments
  • granting reasonable extension if, prior to the due date, the student and teacher negotiate a new submission date. The negotiated date must be recorded on the "Date Deferral Notice" and this notice must be submitted with the assignment.
  • clarifying the course of action (including a mark of zero) if a student does not submit the assignment on the due date and has not taken the responsibility to negotiate a deferred date
  • asking the student to clarify the reason for not completing the assignment
  • helping students develop better time-management skills
  • planning for major assignments to be completed in stages, so that students are less likely to be faced with an all-or-nothing situation at the last minute
  • maintaining ongoing communication with students and/or parents about due dates and late assignments, and scheduling conferences if the problem persists
  • taking into consideration legitimate reasons for missed deadlines
  • setting up a student contract
  • reviewing the need for extra support for English language learners
  • providing alternative assignments or tests/exams where, in the teacher’s professional judgement, it is reasonable and appropriate to do so

 Procedures

If a student has missed or failed to complete Assessment of Learning tasks due to attendance or other issues (e.g., an I – Incomplete - has been recorded in the teacher’s tracking record) the teacher will review student data and determine whether there is sufficient evidence to make a valid and reliable judgement about student achievement.

The teacher will consider the following:

  • Has the student demonstrated the expectations of the missed evaluation(s) through other assignments, observations, or conversations?
  • What is the student’s most consistent level of achievement on the completed evaluations with particular emphasis on the more recent achievements?
  • What is the student’s reason for the missed evaluations?

The teacher will determine the student’s overall level of achievement based on the weight of this evidence or increase the value of other assignments and remove the missing evaluation.

Process for the Teacher

Students should be expected to submit work on time. The teacher must inform students of the due date of an assignment and the ultimate deadline, which is the last opportunity for students to submit the assignment for evaluation. This deadline is set at the teacher’s discretion. Teachers may deduct marks for late submissions. Normally the deduction should not exceed 20% of the value of the assignment.

Missed Evaluations

If, in the teacher’s professional judgement the student has not demonstrated achievement of expectations of the missed evaluations in other evaluations or in another context and/or the student does not have a valid reason for the missed evaluation(s), the teacher may determine that insufficient evidence of achievement has been provided by the student to make an accurate and valid evaluation of student performance. The teacher will consider the student’s most consistent overall level of achievement on completed evaluations but will use professional judgement to determine the mark.  

Students who, despite strategies used to help them, do not submit assignments may be given zero. Teachers evaluate students on achievement of overall curriculum expectations. Therefore, giving a mark of zero will normally result in a gap in the record of achievement of curriculum expectations. The teacher has no evidence of the student’s knowledge or skills related to the expectations evaluated because the student has missed tests, not handed in assignments, or was absent for presentations. Students are accountable for providing the teacher with evidence of their learning. Teachers should not make up or estimate what students know and can do.

Determining the Term Mark (70%)

When calculating the term mark (70%), the teacher must make a judgment as to which evaluations will be used for grading. Teachers must bear in mind the Ministry policy that requires teachers to take into account the student’s most consistent achievement and they must also give attention to the more recent evaluations when they determine the mark out of 70.

When faced with a mark of zero on a student’s assignment, the teacher must use professional judgment to decide whether or not to include this mark in the calculation. In most cases, a zero is an anomaly and is, therefore, not consistent with performance throughout the term. In such cases, a zero will not affect the term grade. Many zeros, however, indicate that the student has not demonstrated achievement of the overall expectations. In such cases, these zeros are factored into the calculation of the term grade.

Missed evaluations will not reduce the final grade if the overall curriculum expectations have been adequately evaluated through other assignments during the term.

Coding

The code “R” represents achievement that falls below level 1 and can be used in the evaluation of student achievement.

The code “I” may be used in a teacher’s record book, to indicate that insufficient evidence is available to determine a mark. For example, teachers may find it appropriate to use “I” when evidence of a student’s achievement is insufficient because the student has enrolled in the school very recently or because there were extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control, such as protracted illness, that affected his or her attendance and/or ability to provide sufficient evidence of achievement of the overall expectations.

In Grade 9 and Grade 10 the code “I” can also be used when reporting insufficient evidence of achievement on the report card.

For more information or to enroll, contact our office at 647-348-3530.

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